Featured Creatives

Will Bryant

September 2016

"Develop a broad range of influences, especially outside of the industry you’re interested in, and constantly be experimenting" - Wise words from Art Director Will Bryant. He tells us about interesting projects going on, talks and murals coming up. Along with some great advice for new grads!

When did you fall in love with design and how did you get started?

I suppose I can recall some important moments in my childhood that contributed, but undergrad at Mississippi State is where things really clicked. I’m pretty sure I fell in love with graphic design while in my first class with Kate Bingaman-Burt. Prior to that class, I had a very limited understanding/exposure examples of graphic design. She introduced me to everything—from zines to Milton Glaser to branding systems to hand lettering to contemporary illustration. I started making a lot of work outside of classes. A lot of weird drawings, watercolor paintings, and screen prints. I also started deejaying ridiculously themed parties where I would do installations and make merch for each show (i.e. “Sweatageddon, the sweat that ends all sweat”). That was a really important time for me creatively. It helped shaped my voice, experiment with style, and diverse my interests.

What was your plan for graduating and what actually happened?

I was considering graduate school, but had no idea what I would do and also received sound advice from several people that it would be best to have a few years out of undergrad to let life happen before diving back into academia. The plan was to marry my childhood sweetheart and move to Portland in 2009, but due to economical reasons we ended up in Austin after the honeymoon. There wasn’t a real plan. I did some freelance work while in undergrad that carried over through graduation and it snowballed into a career. This is not a path I recommend to students. It’s best to go somewhere and get experience! About 3 months after graduation I was fortunate to meet some guys working independently in the creative industry and moved into a shared studio with them (Public School). This is where I started to learn about business—project management, invoicing, taxes, contracts, running meetings, etc. Collectively we grew together and found our way into the creative community through running a blog, throwing parties, and group exhibitions. Individually paths diverged and developed into strong careers over time.

How did you develop your style as an illustrator and what tips would you have for others?

At first I was looking too closely at too few of people. I would suggest anyone to develop a broad range of influences, especially outside of the industry you’re interested in, and constantly be experimenting. Challenge yourself to grow. Your style & voice are going to mature over time, but ONLY if you’re making a TON of work. Ask yourself questions like “why do I like this?” and “what about this illustrator doesn’t do it for me?”. Remember it’s okay to not like things, but always try to be a positive influence.

Tell us about any collaborations you have been working on.

This summer I’ve been working on a series of illustrations (animated gifs) for Adweek covering a wide range of topics. For the past two summers I have had the pleasure of working with the awesome team at Nick Jr. on title treatments and illustrated assets for TV IDs. I have a few apparel designs in multiple Quiet Life collections—one launched this summer and more will be releasing next year that I’m stoked to see!

Whats on the cards professionally and personally in the next 12 months?

I will be speaking this weekend about Public School, alongside Cody Haltom and Keith Davis Young, at ICON The Illustration Conference in Austin, TX. In August I have a solo exhibition of new paintings and sculptures at Companion in Austin, TX. At the end of August I’ll be in Huntington Beach, CA for another mural project with Rudy’s Barbershop. The rest of the time I’ll be hustling on client work to pay the bills, personal work to keep me interested, and hanging with my family as much as possible to keep me grounded.

What advice would you give students starting out?

Being positive, honest, and curious will get you pretty far in life and whatever is next after graduation. Also, keep in mind that you’re likely going to work a lot of jobs that are not your dream job—whether that’s in-house, freelance projects, or part-time. But you should be eager to take on new experiences to figure out what it is that you want to do with design—it just takes time.

Website:  willbryant.com

Instagram:  @willbryantplz

Twitter:  @willbryantplz

Facebook:  willbryantstudio

Tumblr:  @willbryant.com

The
Design
Kids

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and join our design community of emerging graphic designers around the globe.

The
Design
Kids

Add a job!

Price ($AUD): {{ job.boosted ? job.type.boosted : job.type.base }}

What you get:

  • TDK Job board posting for 3 weeks (website, newsletter)
  • Guaranteed instagram post (136,369 followers), facebook post (14,651 followers) and tweet (10,044 followers)

Please note:

  • The image we’ll use on Instagram will be curated by us and loosely linked to your company to get the best results for you from our audience. Sit back and relax, we’ve got this!
  • Internships are free to post, but please be respectful! This is is not a free design service. Our student and graduate following is of the highest quality and we want to honour their talent. Please respect the students and other commitments they might have time/money wise when submitting your ad. Thanks!
  • We love jobs! And so does our audience. Because our following is mostly students and graduates, the best jobs to advertise are for junior and mid weight roles. Specially graphic design, digital design, typography and illustration. Please note these are paid full time or part time roles, so if you have a one off project to advertise, put it under our Freelance jobs dropdown instead. Thanks!
  • (Please note the image we’ll use on Instagram will be of our choice and no necessarily from your company, but will be loosely linked to your ad, it will be the highest of standards and one which you will get the best results from our audiences with. Trust us, we’ve got this!)
  • Welcome to our new section for freelance one-off jobs! To keep things simple, we want to connect you with the talent by advertising what you need, and encouraging people to email you directly with an example of their work. You can choose who to work with from all the submissions you receive. Everything is done online, and you can expect a designer to be dealing with you remotely. The good news is you won’t be limited to talent locally - this is advertised in each of our cities, meaning you will get a much higher standard of work to choose from. Picking a budget is very hard - we do not encourage work for a fiver like some websites, because you will end up with something worth a fiver!

    Our community is full of the best emerging talent, and a average price should be around half of that of a professional. Our community is full of the best talent, and a average price should be around $65 p/h.
  • (Please note the image we’ll use on Instagram will be of our choice and no necessarily from your company, but will be loosely linked to your ad, it will be the highest of standards and one which you will get the best results from our audiences with. Trust us, we’ve got this!)

  • {{ invalidInput() }}

    Successfully submitted job!

    Your job listing will appear on the site after it has been approved by our team.