Romina Malta

Illustrator Romina Malta creates dynamic illustrations out of Buenos Aires for an international client base. We caught up with them to chat about developing their volatile and progressive illustrations, tips on flexibility going both ways, and places to look within your own practice for inspiration.

How did you develop your style as an illustrator and what tips would you have for others?

I think production remains in constant development. My style doesn’t follow methodic procedures, and takes distance from the figurative. You can find it pretty volatile. One day it's printed, another day stays in the digital or textile field. It can also be temporary, like a painted wall that will be torn down in the next few days. There are no real messages.

Tips? Illustrating without expectations is a good practice. Also, leaving things to chance. In my case, I draw/design when I feel like it. I mean, if I realize that for some reason I am lying on the sofa, almost dead, I accept the stagnation, staying there until I leave the oyster. That's why we have to be clear from the first contact with the client. Flexibility has a limit and time isn’t only money, it can be a new project, a state of mind, sleep.

Another good practice is removing a common resource from your routine. Revisit old material, search your notebooks and external disks. Turn on your scanner. Print, paint, scribble and put all your material on a surface. If you are tired, abandoning everything works as well. At any time you can return.

How does the local culture of where you live affect your design work and getting clients?

My work is not relevant here and yes, it affects me positively since all my clients are from abroad.

Based on my experience, trends and many artistic disciplines arrive to Argentina with delay.

Design work by Romina Malta The Design Kids interviews Romina Malta work-2

Talk us through a typical working day include for you right now.

A freelancer’s typical day. I wake up, check emails during breakfast and stay in the studio for several hours. I spend a lot of time with my dog and online.

Sometimes I don’t touch the devices, and come back to my pending projects the next day. In general I draw on the computer, on the iPad, or in a sketchbook. I usually share my routine on social media, like so many others.

What are some of the best and worst parts of your job, day-to-day?

The best thing about my job is staying in the apartment — no public transport, no clock — then I can set the space where I will spend my day. Working in the middle of the night, or with the sunrise, in the living room, with dim lights and soft music. Working alone or with my partner. I can work anywhere. Love that.

Worst? At the moment, a client who doesn't know what direction to take and the dynamic is crazy feedback, out of control.

Design work by Romina Malta The Design Kids interviews Romina Malta work-4
Design work by Romina Malta The Design Kids interviews Romina Malta work-4

Flexibility has a limit and time isn’t only money, it can be a new project, a state of mind, sleep.

How did you name your practice and what does the name represent to you?

Well, I’m an art director, but I have done better in the multidisciplinary practice since I dedicate my time to illustration, sound and graphic design.

What's on the cards professionally and personally in the next 12 months?

In the next 12 months there will be more illustration, color (!) and a sound project. I'm very excited.

Design work by Romina Malta The Design Kids interviews Romina Malta work-6

2019 for you in a sentence.

Pretty good… prettyyy prettyyy good (insert Larry David voice here)

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Design work by Romina Malta The Design Kids interviews Romina Malta work-7

Where to find Romina Malta online.

Website: hi-malta.com

Instagram: @siromo

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